Target Zero Hunger

Informações:

Sinopsis

TARGET: Zero Hunger is a monthly podcast on the stories, issues and policies at the root of global food security. With the latest research and the help of farmers, development experts and decision-makers around the world, each episode sheds a light on different parts of our food systems.

Episodios

  • TZH 21 - Cultivating a new life for Syrian refugees

    TZH 21 - Cultivating a new life for Syrian refugees

    25/07/2018 Duración: 08min

    3.3 million Syrians have fled across the border into Turkey as a result of the Syrian crisis. For the past year, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization(FAO) has been working with government and partners to develop agricultural training programs for Syrian refugees. In this edition of TZH, we hear from Ahmed Ekzayez, an agronomist at FAO in Turkey, and some of the Syrian refugees participating in the training program.   Interview: Charlotta Lomas

  • TZH 20 - Antimicrobial Resistance: Why it matters

    TZH 20 - Antimicrobial Resistance: Why it matters

    18/07/2018 Duración: 08min

    For around 60 years, antibiotics and other antimicrobial drugs have been used to treat and prevent diseases in livestock, aquaculture and crop production, and to make food production generally more efficient. But their overuse and misuse is causing antimicrobial resistance. So how widespread is the problem? And what can be done to stop it? Juan Lubroth, chief veterinary officer at the Food and Agriculture Organization, FAO, explains. Interview: Charlotta Lomas, FAO.

  • TZH 18 - Are we approaching a fish limit?

    TZH 18 - Are we approaching a fish limit?

    13/07/2018 Duración: 09min

    09 July 2018 --- Globally, we’re eating more fish than ever before and that’s set to increase as we head towards a population of 10 billion people by 2050. Fishing is big business and overfishing is threatening our fish supplies. But does this mean we’re approaching a fish limit? Manuel Barange, director of the Fisheries and Aquaculture at the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) explains. Interview: Charlotta Lomas, FAO

  • TZH 18 - The hidden value of forests

    TZH 18 - The hidden value of forests

    13/07/2018 Duración: 08min

    6 July 2018 --- Forests are essential to life on earth: they supply us with the clean air we breathe and regulate our climate. But they also offer so much more. Eva Muller, director of Forestry Policy and Resources at FAO, talks about the state of the world's forests, their hidden value and why we need to protect them. Interview: Charlotta Lomas, FAO

  • TZH 17: Artificial intelligence helps tackle agricultural pest

    TZH 17: Artificial intelligence helps tackle agricultural pest

    13/07/2018 Duración: 09min

    27 June 2018--- Fall Armyworm is spreading quickly across sub-Saharan Africa, devastating crops and farmer’s livelihoods. Experts fear the pest could eventually spread to the Middle East and Europe. But a new mobile phone app ‘Nuru’, which uses machine learning and artificial intelligence, offers some hope in tackling the pest problem. Allan Hruska is the Principal Technical Coordinator on the Fall Armyworm response at the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO). Interview: Charlotta Lomas, FAO

  •  TZH 16 - World Refugee Day - Managing forests in displacement settings

    TZH 16 - World Refugee Day - Managing forests in displacement settings

    20/06/2018 Duración: 11min

    There are 68.5 million refugees, asylum seekers and internally displaced people worldwide, 80 percent of whom rely on woodfuel for cooking and heating. In areas hosting displaced populations, often with scant resources of their own, this reliance on woodfuel is the main driver of forest degradation and deforestation in displacement settings. So how do you balance sustainable forest management with meeting the energy needs of forcibly displaced people? Studio interview with Arturo Gianvenuti, a Forestry Officer at FAO and Andrea Dekrout, Senior Environmental Coordinator at UNHCR was conducted by Charlotta Lomas.        

  • TZH 15 - Colombia: Land rights, agriculture and the quest for peace

    TZH 15 - Colombia: Land rights, agriculture and the quest for peace

    02/08/2017 Duración: 21min

    In this episode we take you to Colombia. We’ll explore how farming and land rights are tied into the country’s quest for sustainable peace after 52 years of civil strife. You’ll hear from the people of Morroa, a community in the district of Sucre. This district is one of five areas in Northern Colombia that have been part of a rural development program that the government is leading to revitalize the local economy. Years of armed conflict between the government and the rebel group FARC left more than 220,000 Colombian dead and it uprooted the lives of over eight million people. Many of those who were caught in the collateral damage of the war were displaced from their homes and lands. FAO’s Nadya Gonzalez went to this region to speak to some of the people who were part of the project. You can find a transcript of this episode here.

  • TZH 14 - Agricultural heritage and the Modern Maasai

    TZH 14 - Agricultural heritage and the Modern Maasai

    21/06/2017 Duración: 22min

    In this episode we are visiting the community of Engarasero, near the border or Kenya and Tanzania. For centuries, semi-nomadic Maasai tribes of East Africa have migrated and herded their cattle through the majestic lands of southern Kenya and northern Tanzania. On the northern Tanzanian side, which we will focus on in this podcast, are millions of miles of Maasai-frequented territory. As Maasai tribes have evolved, along with the landscape of the region, Maasai traditions continue to be anchored in agro-pastoralism, which has been reinforced by their ability to cultivate within these difficult, arid drylands. But with Tanzania’s growing population, economic expansion, restructured land use and pressures of climate change on natural resources, modernity and the countries growth have presented challenges for the Massai people. Growth that threatens their ability to sustain themselves.

  • TZH 13 - Turning black charcoal green

    TZH 13 - Turning black charcoal 'green'

    02/05/2017 Duración: 19min

    Around the world, 3 billion people lack access to clean fuels and technologies for cooking. In Africa, charcoal production has doubled in the past two decades and demand is likely to keep growing as more people move to urban centres. It is cleaner and easier to use than firewood, and is often cheaper and more readily available than gas or electricity. But the surge in charcoal use is contributing to forest degradation and in some areas also to deforestation, especially around large urban centers. So, what can be done to make charcoal use more sustainable? To turn black charcoal ‘green’? A panel of experts join TARGET: Zero hunger podcast host Sandra Ferrari to discuss the issues. 

  • TZH 12 - The listening revolution

    TZH 12 - The listening revolution

    10/04/2017 Duración: 25min

    In this episode, we asked FAO expert Christiane Monsieur to document her trip to a handful of villages in Niger. These villages organize Dimitra Clubs. In communities all throughout Niger, there’s been a quiet revolution going on through these clubs. Its protagonists are tens of thousands-strong. They organize in local groups of women, men and young people. Their goal? Mobilizing communities to find local solutions to local problems – from stray trash to malnutrition. Their method sounds simple – but has proven to be transformational in hundreds of villages across the country: listening to each other.

  • TZH 11 - A canal runs through it

    TZH 11 - A canal runs through it

    26/01/2017 Duración: 25min

    In this episode, we explore the relationship between peace and food security. For today’s story, we gave FAO communications officer Karina Coates a recorder to tape her visits to two FAO projects in retaken areas of Iraq. We asked her to help us better understand the impacts conflict in the region has had on agriculture and how FAO is helping farming communities regain stability. Later in the episode, Lucca Russo, an FAO expert on resilience-building, gives some examples from around the world that show why supporting farmers is so key to preventing post-conflict zones from slipping back into war.

  • TZH 10 – Trapped at sea

    TZH 10 – Trapped at sea

    12/10/2016 Duración: 27min

    Follow us as we take a look at the darker side of seafood: slavery aboard fishing vessels. In this week's episode, we will hear from Rahat, a Thai fisherman who was caught at sea for years before he was finally rescued from an Indonesian island in 2015. We'll also talk with victim advocates and international experts pushing for decent labor standards and stronger inspections aboard these trawlers. Along the way, we'll explore why trafficking and forced work remain so pervasive in the global fishing industry and what fishers stand to gain from a new collaboration between FAO and the International Labor Organization -- a partnership that joins the fight against human trafficking at sea with the fight against illegal fishing. Speakers in this episode include: Nicola Smith from the International Transport Workers Federation Brandt Wagner, head of the Transport and Maritime Unit in the Sectoral Policies Department of the International Labour Organization Felix Marttin, Fisheries Resource Officer at FAO Apinya Taji

  • TZH 09 - A race to save the banana

    TZH 09 - A race to save the banana

    01/08/2016 Duración: 31min

    In this week’s episode, we’re doing something a little different. We sent one of our FAO officers into the field and asked him to document his week-long mission to help stem the spread of a crippling fungus troubling the world’s most-traded fruit. We follow FAO plant disease specialist Fazil Dusunceli to Mozambique and South Africa where he meets with banana farmers, disease experts and concerned government workers – who all share one interest: containing the disease. But what does that mean? And what’s at stake for the 36-billion-dollar industry? Not just for the banana companies, but for the local communities who find work on the plantations, and for producers elsewhere on the continent? Click here for a transcript of this week's episode.   

  • TZH 08 – Agriculture: the view from space

    TZH 08 – Agriculture: the view from space

    20/06/2016 Duración: 21min

    How can satellites benefit agriculture? That’s the central question In this week’s episode, in which we take a closer look at how remote sensing -- or earth monitoring from space – helps farmers and governments take smarter decisions regarding their agriculture, forestry and fisheries. We’ll hear about a new data partnership between FAO and Google, learn how agriculture experts use satellite data in the field, and how this technology has evolved with the switch from analog to digital.

  • TZH07 -Drones, data, food security

    TZH07 -Drones, data, food security

    23/05/2016 Duración: 16min

    What do drones have to offer to agriculture? That’s the central question in this week’s episode of TARGET: Zero hunger. We'll take you on a sonic journey to the Philippines, where FAO is using drones to gather detailed land and crop images for disaster preparedness, and then to the U.S. state of Kansas, where one team of researchers is zooming in on invasive bugs with the help of remote-controlled eyes in the sky.

  • TZH 06- The power of pollinators: why more bees means better food

    TZH 06- The power of pollinators: why more bees means better food

    04/05/2016 Duración: 22min

    In this week’s episode of TARGET: Zero Hunger we explore the power of pollinators. For centuries, bees and other pollinators have labored the world’s fields without winning much recognition for their many contributions to food production. You will hear from Barbara Gemmill-Herren. She spearheaded an FAO-led study into the connection between pollination and crop yield that has been published recently in the magazine Science. Then we will take you to Ghana, West Africa, where our team from the FAO office in Accra drove across the country to visit with Peter Kwapong, Director and Founder of the International Stingless Bee Centre in Cape Coast.

  • TZH 05 - 500 Brazilian Cows  the Future of Food Security

    TZH 05 - 500 Brazilian Cows & the Future of Food Security

    22/04/2016 Duración: 24min

    Brazil's Pantanal region is the world’s largest tropical wetland, with a biodiversity and local culture so rich that it’s a UNESCO World Heritage site. In this week’s episode we take you deep into this region to explore what conserving the genetic heritage of one local animal breed means for this special ecosystem, for local culture and traditions, and for food security on an increasingly harsher planet. Along the way, we hear from researchers at EMBRAPA and the State University of Mato Grosso do Sul who are trying to bring back this unique cattle breed from the edge of extinction, and from a cattle farmers who's family's connection to the Pantaneiro goes back four generations.    

  • TZH 04 - Pulses: Orphan Crop of the Super foods

    TZH 04 - Pulses: Orphan Crop of the Super foods

    29/03/2016 Duración: 25min

    In the fourth episode of TARGET: Zero Hunger we walk you through some fertile ground by digging into the ideas and perceptions concerning one of our world’s most powerful super foods. We explore why pulses have become an orphan crop and we’ll talk to some of the people trying hard to change that. In this episode, we hear Paulina Ceballos from the Global Pulse Confederation explain the trouble with the word "pulse" and why we should celebrate the international year; Food critic and writer Saúl Cepeda speak about the culture of pulses in modern cuisine; Farmer and board member to the World Farmers Organization, Fritz Glauser, explains the benefits of planting pulses; FAO's Teo Calles explains why pulses are good for food security and sheds light on an interesting fact about the international trade of pulses crops.

  • TZH 03 - Can biotech benefit smallholder farmers worldwide?

    TZH 03 - Can biotech benefit smallholder farmers worldwide?

    11/03/2016 Duración: 49min

    In this week’s episode of TARGET: Zero Hunger, we take a closer look at a set of tools that in many ways influence what the future of agriculture will look like. And that set of tools is biotechnology. What kind of biotechnologies are available today and how can they benefit smallholder farmers in the developing world? In February this year, some 400 scientist, farmers, policy makers and industry representatives gathered at the International Symposium on Agricultural Biotechnologies held at FAO headquarters in Rome to answer that question. In this episode, we hear voices from the symposium and review the key issues and technologies at the heart of the global conversation about biotech’s role in sustainable food systems and nutrition.

  • TZH 02 - Catching food fraudsters through isotopes

    TZH 02 - Catching food fraudsters through isotopes

    26/02/2016 Duración: 26min

    In this second episode of TARGET: Zero Hunger we delve in to the $50-billion world of food fraud and the science used to expose it -- to discover that our food has finger prints. Our journey into the authenticity of food takes us from a small cheese shop in Italy to Austria where we explore how FAO and the International Atomic Energy Agency collaborate on nuclear technology for food and agriculture. We'll also hear stories about the rice fields of India and Pakistan. Along the way we talk to producers, scientists and food safety experts about the importance of true food and the role of isotopes as the tiniest of allies in the global fight against fraud.

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