On War & Society

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Sinopsis

From LCMSDS Productions, The On War & Society podcast features interviews with the most prominent historians of war and society. Host Eric Story sits down with his guests to discuss their cutting-edge research, the challenges associated with doing history, and life 'behind the book.'

Episodios

  • Episode 31 - Haunted by Hitler

    Episode 31 - Haunted by Hitler

    17/01/2020 Duración: 25min

    In the summer of 1937, Canadian Prime Minister William Lyon MacKenzie King spent four days in Berlin. He arrived at Friedrichstrasse Station, home of the impressive U-bahn subway which was built in preparation for the 1936 Berlin Olympics; a year later this same station would transport Jewish children to Britain. During his time in Berlin, King visited a Hitler Youth Camp, which was later absorbed into the Sachsenhausen concentration camp. Before he returned to Canada, King sat face to face with Adolf Hitler at the Reich Presidential Palace. “My sizing up of the man as I sat and talked with him,” King later reflected, “was that he is one who truly loves his fellow-men, and his country, and would make any sacrifices for their good.” When King returned to Berlin in 1946, those sites that so impressed him nine years earlier were now in ruins. Today they are marked with memorials to the victims of Nazism. In his new book, Four Days in Hitler’s Germany: MacKenzie King’s Mission to Avert a Second World War, Robert

  • Episode 30 - Malplaquet: The Myth of Decisive Battle

    Episode 30 - Malplaquet: The Myth of Decisive Battle

    02/12/2019 Duración: 37min

    Bankruptcy, famine in the countryside, and a starving army were just some of the crises facing Louis XIV in 1709. Eight years into the War of the Spanish Succession, the allied armies led by the Duke of Marlborough, had also managed to breach the French defences on the Flanders frontier. Threatened with the prospect of invasion, Marshal Villars and his French forces met Marlborough in the field resulting in the climactic Battle of Malplaquet, halting the allied advance and changing the course of the war. Or so this is how the battle if often remembered. Darryl Dee is not so sure. His research questions the idea that the Battle of Malplaquet, and battles in general, can ever be so decisive. In this episode of On War & Society, Darryl Dee and Kyle Falcon discuss researching and teaching the great battles in history.

  • Episode 29 - Making a Historian

    Episode 29 - Making a Historian

    01/10/2019 Duración: 33min

    On this month's episode Of On War and Society, Kyle Pritchard sits down with Dr Roger Sarty to discuss the life and career of CP Stacey. Sarty explains how CP Stacey went from being a young student with no interest in research to the founding father of Canadian military history. Throughout his career Stacey faced considerable set backs in the form of limited finances, a tight job market, a public initially hostile to his work and personal tragedy. But through his own hard work and the considerable of help from his family and fellow historians, Stacey was able to make a career as a historian, first in the army as historical officer and later as a university based historian. As a historian Stacey displayed a rare gift for understanding the demands of war, a gift which earned him the admiration of the Canadian Military. But despite his success Stacey remained a humble and deeply generous man who helped start the career of some of Canada's greatest historians. 

  • Episode 28 - The Society of the Righteous and Harmonious Fists

    Episode 28 - The Society of the Righteous and Harmonious Fists

    01/09/2019 Duración: 43min

    As Canadians, there is a sense that international collaboration has acted and continues to act as a positive force in the world today. Yet certain events serve as a reminder that the foundations of our international relationships have sometimes developed not out of cooperation, but out of aggression and intervention. The Boxer Rebellion unfolded during the high tide of imperialism at the turn of the 20th century. In response to pressure from foreign diplomatic and religious influences, the Boxers, or the Society of the Righteous and Harmonious Fists, rose as an anti-foreign Buddhist sect, taking control over large swaths of Northern China resulting in the deaths of some 200 Western missionaries and over 2000 Chinese Christian converts. The international involvement to put down the Boxer Rebellion, through an eight nation alliance which occupied and divided Beijing, not only provides a litmus test to measure the imperial ambitions of Western nations, but also speaks to what happens when our communications have

  • Episode 27 - Assault on the Winter Line

    Episode 27 - Assault on the Winter Line

    01/08/2019 Duración: 32min

    The Italian Campaign during the Second World War remains a subject of controversy—whether it was “Normandy’s Long Right Flank” or a costly stalemate continues to be debated by historians to modern day. Terry Copp, director emeritus of the Laurier Centre for Military Strategic and Disarmament Studies, believes he has found a new multinational approach to studying the Italian Campaign as he zeroes in on the late 1943/early 1944 Allied assault on the Axis Winter Line. The Winter Line was the site of many famous battles that have since become important national icons, including Ortona, Orsogna, the Rapido River and Monte Cassino. Terry insists to properly comprehend the campaign historians should look passed the national narratives and address the combat operations across the entire peninsula. 

  • Episode 26 - Nazis, Canadian Jews and the Second World War

    Episode 26 - Nazis, Canadian Jews and the Second World War

    01/07/2019 Duración: 38min

    Jewish people are traditionally depicted as victims in the Second World War literature. This should come as no surprise, as six million Jews were killed at the hands of the Nazis during the Holocaust. Ellin Bessner, in her new book Double Threat, insists that at least in the case of Jewish Canadians, they were not just victims of the war but also active players in the eventual victory of the Allies against Germany and the Axis powers during the Second World War. Canadian Jews enlisted at the same proportional rates as the rest of Canada and served valiantly and bravely in the face of an enemy that not only wanted to see them defeated in battle but exterminated from the face of the earth. References Irving Abella and Harold Troper. None is Too Many: Canada and the Jews of Europe, 1933–1948. Toronto: Lester & Orpen Dennys, 1983. Ellin Bessner. Double Threat: Canadian Jews, the Military and World War II. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2018.

  • Episode 25 - Ted Barris and the Dam Busters

    Episode 25 - Ted Barris and the Dam Busters

    01/06/2019 Duración: 30min

    Sometimes we find Canadians in the most unlikely of places. During the Second World War, within the crews of airmen responsible for breaching the Ruhr dams of Nazi Germany, there were thirty Canadians. In 1943, these men, along with about a hundred others, took to the skies in May 1943 aboard nineteen Lancaster Bombers to drop the now infamous bouncing bombs that would devastate enemy power plants, factories and German infrastructure after blowing up several dams. Now known as the Dam Busters, in this interview, Ted Barris discusses the deeds of these Canadian airmen and legacies they left behind. Ted Barris is a journalist and award-winning author of 18 books. He lived in Oxbow, Ontario. References Ted Barris. Dam Busters: Canadian Airmen and the Secret Raid on Nazi Germany (Toronto: HarperCollins, 2018).

  • On War  Society Special: D-Day in 14 Stories with Elliot Halpern

    On War & Society Special: D-Day in 14 Stories with Elliot Halpern

    27/05/2019 Duración: 24min

    As the Second World War fades from living memory, D-Day, the Allied operation whose success led to the liberation of France and the rest of Western Europe from Axis forces, continues to serve as a microcosm for the preservation of democratic values in the world today. For those who fought, D-Day has important lessons to teach about how the past is remembered and what stories we tell to future generations. In this On War and Society Special Episode, guest host Kyle Pritchard talks with producer Elliott Halpern to discuss a new documentary airing on History, formerly the History Channel, on June 1st, 2019 at 9 pm. “D-Day in 14 Stories” blends first-hand accounts with re-enactments and animated renderings of the landings and is exclusively narrated by veterans and witnesses of the Allied Invasion of Normandy. To commemorate the 75th Anniversary of the landings next month, "D-Day in 14 Stories" offers a varied account of the strategic and personal challenges veterans and others faced. Elliott Halpern is an Emmy-a

  • Episode 24 – Ambitions Unrealized

    Episode 24 – Ambitions Unrealized

    01/05/2019 Duración: 26min

    The contribution of nurses to attend to the wounded was essential to military care and recovery during the First World War. Less noted is the role of the middle class and educated, though largely unqualified, women who assisted in filling in the gaps at overburdened hospitals and convalescent homes as voluntary nurses. In this episode, guest host Kyle Pritchard sits down with Linda Quiney to discuss her research on the Canadian Voluntary Aid Detachment in her new book, This Small Army of Women. Women drawn to voluntary medical service sought a mixed sense of camaraderie, patriotism and adventure. Yet many experienced difficult and mundane work as a result of hostility from professional nurses and doctors who doubted their abilities. While some continued in emerging disciplines like physiotherapy and dietetics after they returned to Canada, others found it difficult to continue in the medical field. Whether they married or continued on in another career, Linda suggests that the majority of women went back to t

  • Episode 23 – Stalins Gulag

    Episode 23 – Stalin's Gulag

    01/04/2019 Duración: 31min

    Sometimes we forget that the field of war and society encompasses so much more than Canada. Many of the guests we've had on our show study the history of war and society in Canada, but in this episode, Wilson Bell speaks about the Soviet Gulag system during the Second World War and his new book, Stalin's Gulag at War. Wilson Bell is an associate professor of history at Thompson Rivers University. He is the author of numerous articles on the Gulag, and his first book, Stalin’s Gulag at War, was published in 2018 with the University of Toronto Press. References Wilson T. Bell, Stalin's Gulag at War: Forced Labour, Mass Death, and Soviet Victory during the Second World War (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2018).

  • Episode 22 – Shell Shock

    Episode 22 – Shell Shock

    01/03/2019 Duración: 41min

    Shell shock has become a stand-in for the experience of all soldiers of the First World War. And it has also become one of the most popular topics of inquiry for historians of the First World War. Mark Humphries, associate professor history at Wilfrid Laurier University and Director of the Laurier Centre for Military Strategic and Disarmament Studies, has contributed another addition to the ever-growing literature on the topic with his new book on shell shock in the Canadian Expeditionary Force during the First World War. Looking at the experience of doctors and patients as well as the medical management system that developed overseas, he investigates how shell shock was managed and mismanaged and how the search for a solution remained elusive. References Mark Osborne Humphries, A Weary Road: Shell Shock in the Canadian Expeditionary Force, 1914–1918. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2018. 

  • Episode 21 – Rural Canada at War

    Episode 21 – Rural Canada at War

    31/01/2019 Duración: 33min

    We know a lot about the urban experience during the First World War in Canada but far less about the rural equivalent. Canadian historians sometimes assume––and quite wrongly––that the urban Canadian experience of the war can stand in for the rural. But it can't. Jonathan Vance's new book A Township at War shows that the conventional narrative of the First World War in Canada did not match that of East Flamborough from 1914 to 1918. Prohibition, conscription, suffrage, enemy alien internment––these are the issues encountered time and again when writing about the First World War. But in a small rural southern Ontario community, these were not the pressing issues of the day. The issues were starkly different. Jonathan F. Vance is a Distinguished University Professor and J.B. Smallman Chair in the Department of History at Western University where he teaches military history, Canadian history and social memory. He is the author of many books and articles, including Death So Noble (1997), Unlikely Soldiers (2008),

  • Episode 20 – Uncovering the Secret History of Soldiers

    Episode 20 – Uncovering the Secret History of Soldiers

    31/12/2018 Duración: 28min

    Since the late 1990s, Canadian historian Tim Cook has carved out a niche in the field of First World War history. In his two-volume social history of the war, he spoke of a soldiers’ culture, which bound Canadians together on the battlefields and helped them cope with the immense stress and strain of war from 1914 to 1918. This year, published with Allen Lane, Tim released The Secret History of Soldiers, a book dedicated solely to this soldiers’ culture that has become his most significant contribution to our understanding of the First World War in Canada. Tim speaks of a few of the aspects of this soldiers’ culture, including swearing, slang and material objects. At the end of the war, this culture did not necessarily disappear. In Legion halls and reunions, veterans recreated this culture in a civilian world, however temporary it might have been. Tim Cook is the First World War historian at the Canadian War Museum. He is the author of 11 books, including Shock Troops, Vimy and most recently, The Secret Hist

  • Episode 19 – How to Write 7,000 Words in a Week

    Episode 19 – How to Write 7,000 Words in a Week

    30/11/2018 Duración: 23min

    Tim Cook loves to write. As many Canadian historians will attest, Tim is one of the most prolific writers in the profession––both in terms of volume and content. Since 1998, Tim has published a dozen books on the First and Second World Wars, greatly advancing our knowledge of both. But how does he do it? In this month’s episode, Tim discusses the process of researching and writing, as well as his new book, The Secret History of Soldiers, published with Allen Lane this year. In a jaw-dropping statement, Tim revealed how many words he writes per week. Tim Cook is the First World War historian at the Canadian War Museum. He has published a dozen books on the history of the First and Second World Wars and is the recipient of many awards for his writing including the RBC Taylor Prize, the J.W. Dafoe Prize (twice) and the C.P. Stacey Prize (twice). He was recently awarded the Queen's Diamond Jubilee Medal and the Governor General's History Award for Popular Media. Tim is a Member of the Order of Canada. References

  • Episode 18 – Why Military Families Matter, Pt. 2

    Episode 18 – Why Military Families Matter, Pt. 2

    31/10/2018 Duración: 29min

    Military families are essential to the care of veterans in both the past and present. Yet current veteran policies and programs do not fully provide the necessary services military families require for the process of healing and recovery. For the final episode of our four-part series on the past and present experiences of veterans in Canada, two scholars, a veteran and a caregiver continue their discussion of the effects of military service on veterans’ families. Drawing comparisons between veteran and family experiences during the First World War and the present, the guests discuss current research and the challenges mental trauma places on the family dynamic. These challenges include recognizing the sacrifices of military spouses and the risk of intergenerational trauma being passed down to veterans’ children. The discussion reveals how the fears of veterans and their families have been shaped by changes in government responsibilities to the veteran community over the past century and how this history conti

  • Episode 17 - Why Military Families Matter, Pt. 1

    Episode 17 - Why Military Families Matter, Pt. 1

    01/10/2018 Duración: 41min

    Soldiers returning from the battlefield rarely return unscathed. Yet veterans’ families continue to be inadequately prepared for the difficulties of military life. For episode three of four on the past and present experiences of veterans in Canada, two scholars and two veterans discuss the effects of veteran deployment and eventual discharge on military family well-being. Their discussion reveals the need to listen to military family advocates to better inform policy, but also how many military families are unaware of the financial and emotional support available, and the fear of admitting vulnerability that sometimes prevents veterans and military families from receiving the therapeutic, financial and community assistance they require. This episode in funded by the Department of National Defence. It is hosted by Dr. Geoffrey Hayes of the University of Waterloo. Panelists are Dr. Jessica Meyer, Dr. Deborah Norris, Jody Mitic and Kim Davis.

  • Episode 16 – Unpacking the Trauma Kit, Pt. 2

    Episode 16 – Unpacking the Trauma Kit, Pt. 2

    31/08/2018 Duración: 40min

    Wars often time come home. Reintegration into civilian life comes with a whole new set of challenges for veterans. For the second part of our four-part series on the past and present experiences of veterans in Canada, two historians and two veterans discuss the instability of civilian life for many veterans after having served in the military. Mental trauma, both sustained on the battlefield and even after returning home, contributes to this instability, as the government and larger Canadian society fails to understand the challenges many veterans face. This episode is funded by the Department of National Defence. It is hosted by Dr. Amy Milne-Smith of Wilfrid Laurier University’s History Department. Panelists are Dr. Mark Humphries, Dr. Claire Cookson-Hills, Bruce Moncur and Marie-Claude Gagnon.

  • Episode 15 – Unpacking the Trauma Kit, Pt. 1

    Episode 15 – Unpacking the Trauma Kit, Pt. 1

    31/07/2018 Duración: 29min

    Too often we forget the casualties of war. Whether on film, in novels and even in writing history, scenes of soldiering and warfare pervade while the aftermath is ignored. Nationalism is deeply intertwined with many twenty and twenty-first century wars, making it sometimes difficult to acknowledge war’s painful legacies. Over the next few months, we are hoping to counter that narrative by bringing the historical and contemporary experiences of Canadian veterans to the fore.  This episode is part one of two on the past and present experiences of veterans in Canada. A panel consisting of two historians and two veterans discuss issues relating to mental health and trauma among Canadian veterans of twentieth and twenty-first century wars. This episode is funded by the Department of National Defence. It is hosted by Dr. Amy Milne-Smith of Wilfrid Laurier University’s History Department. Panelists are Dr. Mark Humphries, Dr. Claire Cookson-Hills, Bruce Moncur and Marie-Claude Gagnon.

  • Episode 14 – Rewriting the Great War

    Episode 14 – Rewriting the Great War

    29/06/2018 Duración: 30min

    Since 2014, there has been an outpouring of literature on the First World War that has moved the field in exciting new directions. Over thirty books have been released by Canadian academic presses over the past almost four years, including titles on conscription, shell shock, and the memory of the war. But before these books were published, Mark Humphries wrote an intriguing 2014 article in the Canadian Historical Review about the historiography of the First World War in Canada and where he thought the field should lead next. Among several other revealing insights, he urged future scholars to adopt a transnational approach that would challenge the exceptionalist literature that characterizes Canadian First World War history-writing. But where has the field gone since? Mark has some thoughts. Mark is the director of the Laurier Centre for Military Strategic and Disarmament Studies, the Dunkley Chair in War and the Canadian Experience and an Associate Professor in the Department of History at Wilfrid Laurier Un

  • Episode 13 – Family at the Front

    Episode 13 – Family at the Front

    30/05/2018 Duración: 29min

    Nearly 660,000 bags of mail were sent to Canada from soldiers in France and Belgium during the First World War. In this episode, Dr. Kristine Alexander sits down with Kyle Pritchard to discuss her research on the topic of families, children, and letter-writing during the First World War. Kristine is an associate professor in history, a Canadian Research Chair, and Director of the Institute for Child and Youth Studies at the University of Lethbridge. Her book Guiding Modern Girlspublished in 2017, examines the connections which linked girlhood with colonialism and empire in the post-war and inter-war periods. In her new research, Kristine contends that letter-writing is a valuable entry point into the study of family under wartime conditions and finds that a more critical approach to these letters reveal soldiers often defied the emotional tropes historians have assigned to them. References  Alexander, Kristine.Guiding Modern Girls: Girlhood, Empire, and Internationalism in the 1920s and 1930s. Vancouver: UBC

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