The Economist: Money talks

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Sinopsis

In these podcasts, our correspondents discuss the most important business, finance and economics news of the week

Episodios

  • Money Talks: Can Disney rekindle the magic?

    26/01/2023 Duración: 41min

    The Walt Disney Company turns 100 years old this week. But the silver screen success that helped it become the world’s biggest entertainment company will not be enough to keep it on top for another century. As households swap cable packages for streaming, and kids turn to gaming, rather than movies, Disney needs reanimating.On this week’s podcast, hosts Tom Lee-Devlin, Alice Fulwood and Mike Bird ask whether Disney has lost its touch. The Economist’s Tom Wainwright takes us on a tour of the Magic Kingdom, to assess its sprawling empire. Analyst Rich Greenfield explains why the company is losing billions on streaming. And Matthew Ball, former head of strategy for Amazon Studios, tells us about the big bet Disney needs to make if it wants to retain its crown.For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

  • Money Talks: How globalisation gave way

    19/01/2023 Duración: 41min

    America has changed the way it views the rest of the world. Rather than pushing for a more globalised economy with fewer trade barriers, the US is now seeking a more protected system of international trade. President Biden’s Inflation Reduction Act promises nearly $400bn to boost clean energy and reduce dependence on China for things like batteries for electric cars. The Chips Act, meanwhile, provides incentives worth $52bn to boost America’s semiconductor industry.On this week’s podcast, hosts Mike Bird and Alice Fulwood examine what this new zero-sum era means for the global economy. Chad Bown from the Peterson Institute for International Economics tells them the age of globalisation isn’t returning any time soon. Henry Gao from Singapore Management University blames America’s attempt to “out-China China by becoming more like China”.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and a

  • Money Talks: The new power in the North Sea

    12/01/2023 Duración: 35min

    For decades, the North Sea’s fierce gales have created a challenge for those extracting the oil and gas buried beneath its swells. But the region’s poor weather is also the key to its future: offshore wind. And the plans are surprisingly ambitious.On this week’s podcast, hosts Tom Lee-Devlin, Alice Fulwood and Mike Bird ask whether the North Sea can turn green. The Economist’s Matthieu Favas says wind farms in the North Sea could power Europe’s 200m homes. Jesper Frost Rasmussen, mayor of Esbjerg, explains how the offshore wind industry has changed life in the Danish port town. Ulrik Stridbæk of Orsted, the world’s largest offshore wind developer, says that some sites are already generating the same amount of power as a large nuclear power station. Plus, we speak to Thomas Dalsgaard about why his firm, Copenhagen Infrastructure Partners, wants to build a physical island 100 kilometres off the coast of Denmark. Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the ec

  • Money Talks: The economics of thinness

    05/01/2023 Duración: 34min

    Across the rich world there is a negative relationship between incomes and weight, as measured by body mass index. The richer people are, the thinner they tend to be. But separate the data by gender and a startling gap appears. Rich women are much thinner than poorer ones; but rich men and poor men are just as likely to be overweight or obese.On this week’s podcast, hosts Alice Fulwood and Thomas Lee-Devlin examine why it may be rational, in economic terms, for ambitious women to pursue thinness. John Cawley of Cornell University explains his research that suggests overweight women have lower salaries than their thinner peers. We examine the legacy of Helen Gurley Brown, the outspoken former editor-in-chief of Cosmopolitan magazine, who championed dieting to get ahead. And Jennifer Shinall, a law professor at Vanderbilt University, considers potential solutions to weight-based discrimination.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.c

  • Money Talks: TikTok’s ticking time bomb—an episode from our archive

    28/12/2022 Duración: 38min

    It’s the fastest growing app in the world, filled with dance trends, cats misbehaving, and questionable financial advice. Teenagers love it; Western politicians are less convinced. Could TikTok’s popularity be its downfall?In one of our favourite episodes of 2022, hosts Mike Bird, Alice Fulwood and Soumaya Keynes investigate just who is afraid of TikTok’s growing influence. First, our media editor Tom Wainwright unpacks the relationship between TikTok, its parent company ByteDance, and its Chinese twin, Douyin. Then, AB Bernstein’s Robin Zhu outlines just how big a threat the app poses to the likes of Facebook, Snapchat, and YouTube. Plus, Federal Communications Commissioner Brendan Carr outlines his concerns about TikTok’s ability to harvest user data. And we ask: how long before this ticking geopolitical time-bomb blows up? Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio

  • Money Talks: Is Christmas becoming more efficient?

    21/12/2022 Duración: 39min

    Economists are a gloomy lot, and no less so at Christmas. Whereas most people see gift-giving as a source of joy, economists fret about the potential for misallocated resources. One Scrooge-ish study found that, on average, $100 spent on gifts was worth the same as around $85 of cash spent directly by the recipient. But are there reasons to believe that over time, Christmas is becoming more efficient?On this week’s podcast, hosts Soumaya Keynes, Mike Bird and Alice Fulwood hear from the father of Scroogenomics, Joel Waldfogel, about why Christmas may be improving for economists—even if it means fewer presents. And they speak to The Economist’s Ore Ogunbiyi about the nightmare after Christmas for retailers.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more informat

  • Money Talks: The changing ideology of Silicon Valley

    14/12/2022 Duración: 40min

    Startup founders in Silicon Valley are often motivated by an almost religious idealism: young tech workers, looking to move fast and break things, want to use technology to make the world a better place. But 2022 has brought about a reckoning: the business models of once-star firms, such as Uber and Meta, are under threat; the allure of the dishevelled whizz-kid has been undermined by the downfall of Sam Bankman-Fried; and the expense of Palo Alto has pushed plucky startups out. The Bay Area has often been populated by liberals, but many of tech’s heroes, like Elon Musk and Marc Andreessen, have shifted to the right. On this week’s podcast, hosts Mike Bird, Soumaya Keynes and Alice Fulwood ask whether Silicon Valley has lost its religion. Margaret O’Mara, professor of history at the University of Washington, reveals the Valley’s past. And Adrian Daub, the author of “What Tech Calls Thinking”, tells us that the secret of the successful founder is to bamboozle regulators while they make a bit more money.To

  • Money Talks: China reopens

    07/12/2022 Duración: 35min

    China’s draconian zero-covid policies have required repeated and lengthy lockdowns, enormous make-shift quarantine facilities, and endless testing for the population. They have also done real damage to its economy. After rare outbreaks of protest against the policy in several cities, the strict rules that have smothered normal life around the country are being relaxed, after almost three years in place.On this week’s podcast, hosts Mike Bird, Soumaya Keynes and Alice Fulwood ask what this means for the Chinese economy—and the world. One of China’s best-known investors, Fred Hu, tells us the policy has been driving China’s economy “to the ground” and Goldman Sachs’ Andrew Tilton says that restrictions have shaved up to 5% off GDP growth. But what will happen as China opens up?Take our listener survey at economist.com/moneytalkssurveySign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audi

  • Money Talks: The new rules of investment

    30/11/2022 Duración: 39min

    High inflation, amid warnings of a global recession, is forcing investors to tear up the rule book. Since the financial crisis, bonds have been seen as a safe bet—even if they did not promise much of a return. Equity markets, led by soaring tech stocks, were where fortunes were made. Both have plunged this year. In a world where rising interest rates have left governments worrying about how to afford their debts, and companies will struggle to raise cash, investors need new strategies.On this week’s podcast, hosts Alice Fulwood, Soumaya Keynes and Mike Bird ask what those new rules of investing look like. Wei Li, global chief investment strategist for the world’s biggest investor, BlackRock, argues this new macroeconomic era is here to stay. And Mohamed El-Erian, chief economic adviser to Allianz, says investors need to focus on picking winners within stocks and bonds.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks 

  • Money Talks: Why it’s time to talk about Indonesia

    23/11/2022 Duración: 38min

    Indonesia is the world’s third-largest producer of coal. Not only does it power the country, it powers the economy. But the country’s president, Joko Widodo, wants to change that. Indonesia is garnering global attention due to its stock of nickel and cobalt, core elements in the batteries needed for the booming electric vehicle industry. Can the government swap the fossil-fuel-powered economy to one that runs on batteries instead?On this week’s podcast, hosts Soumaya Keynes, Mike Bird and Alice Fulwood ask whether Indonesia can really go green. Zanny Minton Beddoes, The Economist’s editor-in-chief, sits down with Joko Widodo to find out if he is the man to wean the country off coal. Finance minister Sri Mulyani Indrawati and education minister Nadiem Makarim tell us how to train a generation of battery-makers. And Patrick Foulis, our business-affairs editor, warns of a red flag.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks 

  • Money Talks: The cryptocalypse

    16/11/2022 Duración: 44min

    Until last week, Sam Bankman-Fried - or SBF as he’s become known - was crypto’s poster-child. He was a regular in Washington, DC where he schmoozed journalists, regulators and lawmakers alike. He funded political campaigns and sponsored sports teams ranging from basketball to Formula One. For many, the floppy-haired, 30-year-old once-billionaire wasn’t just the face of his crypto trading firm FTX, he was the face of crypto.But last week, SBJ’s business, which was valued at $32bn at the start of the year, collapsed into bankruptcy and now he is being investigated by regulators and law-enforcement agencies.On this week’s “Money Talks’, hosts Alice Fulwood and Soumaya Keynes ask whether the crypto phenomenon can survive the loss of a figurehead. They speak with Alesia Haas, the CFO of the second-largest exchange Coinbase. And hear from some of the recipients of SBF’s contributions to the effective altruism movement about what’s next. Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets

  • Money Talks: Is pay transparency good?

    09/11/2022 Duración: 34min

    On November 1st, New York City’s workers woke up to a new reality: every job listing for work that could be done in one of the five boroughs now had a stated salary band. Gossips rejoiced. But who does the law really benefit?On this week’s podcast, hosts Soumaya Keynes, Mike Bird and Alice Fulwood look at the pros and cons of pay transparency. First, they hear from Harvard Business School’s Zoe Cullen who says wages fell by 2% on average when firms opened up about pay. Then, they speak to Joel Gascoigne, the founder of online marketing firm Buffer, who went further than companies in New York and published each of his employees’ salaries, by name, on the company’s website (it lists his salary as $298,958). And then they go to Norway, where incomes have always been publicly available - and hear about the unexpected consequences on happiness when you can easily see what your friends, neighbours and enemies earn. Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the eco

  • Money Talks: The tech reckoning

    02/11/2022 Duración: 35min

    Most of America’s biggest technology firms are having a bad time - and not just the ones who have been recently acquired by a mercurial billionaire. More than $1tn has been wiped from their market value in recent weeks. Is the sell-off just investor jitters? Or is it a symptom of something more fundamental about the future of the sector? On this week’s podcast, hosts Soumaya Keynes, Mike Bird and Alice Fulwood are joined by our technology editor Tom Wainwright and global business correspondent Thomas Lee-Devlin to diagnose the common problem facing the movers (like Uber), the streamers (like Netflix) and the creepers (like Facebook owner, Meta). And we ask what they can learn from China, where tech behemoth Alibaba has seen its share price plunge by 77% from a 2020 peak. Plus, we ask if this is a turning point - what does that mean for the future of the formerly most profitable sector in America?Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.ec

  • Money Talks: Wall Street's top cop

    26/10/2022 Duración: 37min

    Gary Gensler has spent just a little over a year and a half as the head of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), America’s top markets regulator. In that time, he’s proposed 37 separate filings for rules, given 60 speeches, and intervened, in sometimes controversial ways, in everything from crypto to SPACs to environmental regulations. In other words: he is getting a lot done and making a lot of people angry. On this week’s episode, hosts Alice Fulwood, Mike Bird and Soumaya Keynes sit down with Mr Gensler to try and figure out what he wants to accomplish and how he plans on getting it all done. They discuss everything from the functioning of the Treasury market, to efforts to prioritise retail investors in the wake of the meme-stock craze, to why he thought it was important that the SEC fine the reality television star Kim Kardashian.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print,

  • Money Talks: How to rebuild Ukraine

    19/10/2022 Duración: 39min

    Ukraine’s economy is both hurting and defying expectations. The International Monetary Fund (IMF) estimates that GDP will shrink by 35% this year and inflation is running at 24%. Yet slowly and grimly the country’s economy has adapted to war—and seems to be growing again. What can and should the long march back to normalcy look like?On this week’s podcast, hosts Mike Bird, Soumaya Keynes and Alice Fulwood are joined by our European economics editor Christian Odendahl and our Europe correspondent Matt Steinglass, who is in Ukraine, to discuss the country’s economic future. They hear from Yuriy Ryzhenkov, the boss of Metinvest, Ukraine’s largest steel company and the owner of the factory that became the site of a deadly siege in Mariupol, about how the firm is adapting. And Vladyslav Rashkovan, the alternate executive director at the IMF responsible for Ukraine, outlines the key areas Western powers should be thinking about in terms of their plans to offer reconstruction aid to the country.Sign up for our new w

  • Money Talks: Panic economics

    12/10/2022 Duración: 38min

    This year’s Nobel prize in economics was awarded to Ben Bernanke, Philip Dybvig, and Douglas Diamond for their pioneering research into the role that banks play in financial crises. On this week’s episode, hosts Soumaya Keynes, Mike Bird and Alice Fulwood speak with Professors Dybvig and Diamond about their eponymous model of financial panics - one economics’ most cited papers - and ask whether policymakers have truly absorbed their insights.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

  • Money Talks: Managing the consultants

    05/10/2022 Duración: 32min

    The image of management consultants has taken a pounding in recent years, giving the industry a reputation for unscrupulousness on par with investment bankers. And a recent difficulties and controversies at the three most prestigious firms - McKinsey, Bain and Boston Consulting Group (BCG), known collectively as MBB - hasn’t exactly helped the perception that they serve mostly to bamboozle CEOs while collecting fat fees. Can the industry be reformed?On this week’s episode, hosts Mike Bird, Alice Fulwood and Soumaya Keynes are joined by our global business correspondent Thomas Lee Devlin to find out more about the booming business for advice, and the problems that bedevilling the industrry. They also speak with New York Times journalists Michael Forsythe and Walt Bogdanich about their newly-published book, “When McKinsey Comes to Town”, looking at failures at the most prestigious consultancy, McKinsey - failures that McKinsey says misrepresent its business. Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting

  • Money Talks: The rate shock

    28/09/2022 Duración: 33min

    The world’s financial markets are going through their most painful adjustment since the global financial crisis. Global stock markets have sold off sharply and bond markets are on course for their worst year since 1949. The British pound briefly fell to its lowest level ever against the dollar. And the Japanese government has intervened to prop up the value of the yen for the first time since 1998. What’s underlying this shift?On this week’s episode, hosts Alice Fulwood, Mike Bird and Soumaya Keynes are joined by our business affairs editor Patrick Foulis to parse the fallout from this month’s synchronous decision by the majority of the world’s central banks to raise interest rates. They’ll look at the idiosyncrasies of two outliers: Britain, where the government’s tax cuts are at odds with the Bank of England’s desire to reign in prices, and Japan, where the central bank recently decided to keep rates negative. Plus, Blue Bay Asset Management’s chief investment officer Mark Dowding explains why he’s decided

  • Money Talks: Beyond seasonable doubt

    21/09/2022 Duración: 37min

    Lawsuits aimed at green-house gas emissions are a growing trend, and better science is making them more precise. As ESG comes under attack, could these suits represent a different front in pressuring companies to act on climate change?On this week’s episode, hosts Alice Fulwood and Mike Bird speak with our environment editor Catherine Brahic about the rise in climate litigation aimed at holding companies responsible for climate change. Then, we head to Peru, to meet the farmer at the centre of a potentially seismic court case against Germany’s largest electricity firm. Finally, Sophie Marjanac of the environmental organisation ClientEarth explains why the law can be a useful way to outline the responsibilities of corporations when it comes to greenhouse gas emissions and who pays the costs of a warming planet.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe t

  • Money talks: India's moment

    14/09/2022 Duración: 36min

    India’s economy recently overtook Britain’s to be the world’s fifth largest, and it’s on track to be the fastest growing big economy this year. Part of what’s powering that growth is renewed domestic investment by the country’s big conglomerates. Could this be the year that India’s promise is realised?On this week’s episode, hosts Mike Bird, Soumaya Keynes and Alice Fulwood examine what’s powering India’s growth. First, Natarajan Chandrasekaran, the chairman of India’s biggest conglomerate, Tata Sons, explains why the company is investing domestically. Then, our global energy and climate innovation editor Vijay Vaitheeswaran heads to Pune, where he finds that India’s green energy transition is well underway. Finally, our Mumbai bureau chief Tom Easton takes a tour of Tamil Nadu, where he sees factories rapidly being built to help power India’s domestic manufacturing transition. Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneyt

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