Freakonomics Radio

Informações:

Sinopsis

Discover the hidden side of everything with Stephen J. Dubner, co-author of the Freakonomics books. Each week, Freakonomics Radio tells you things you always thought you knew (but didnt) and things you never thought you wanted to know (but do)  from the economics of sleep to how to become great at just about anything. Dubner speaks with Nobel laureates and provocateurs, intellectuals and entrepreneurs, and various other underachievers. Special features include series like The Secret Life of a C.E.O. as well as a live game show, Tell Me Something I Dont Know. 

Episodios

  • 401. How Many Prince Charleses Can There Be in One Room?

    401. How Many Prince Charleses Can There Be in One Room?

    26/12/2019 Duración: 33min

    In a special holiday episode, Stephen Dubner and Angela Duckworth take turns asking each other questions about charisma, wealth vs. intellect, and (of course) grit.

  • Why Is This Man Running for President? (Ep. 362 Update)

    Why Is This Man Running for President? (Ep. 362 Update)

    19/12/2019 Duración: 59min

    A year ago, nobody was taking Andrew Yang very seriously. Now he is America’s favorite entrepre-nerd, with a candidacy that keeps gaining momentum. This episode includes our Jan. 2019 conversation with the leader of the Yang Gang and a fresh interview recorded from the campaign trail in Iowa.

  • 400. How to Hate Taxes a Little Bit Less

    400. How to Hate Taxes a Little Bit Less

    12/12/2019 Duración: 42min

    Every year, Americans short the I.R.S. nearly half a trillion dollars. Most ideas to increase compliance are more stick than carrot — scary letters, audits, and penalties. But what if we gave taxpayers a chance to allocate how their money is spent, or even bribed them with a thank-you gift?

  • 399. Honey, I Grew the Economy

    399. Honey, I Grew the Economy

    05/12/2019 Duración: 43min

    Innovation experts have long overlooked where a lot of innovation actually happens. The personal computer, the mountain bike, the artificial pancreas — none of these came from some big R&D lab, but from users tinkering in their homes. Acknowledging this reality — and encouraging it — would be good for the economy (and the soul too).

  • How to Change Your Mind (Ep. 379 Rebroadcast)

    How to Change Your Mind (Ep. 379 Rebroadcast)

    28/11/2019 Duración: 45min

    There are a lot of barriers to changing your mind: ego, overconfidence, inertia — and cost. Politicians who flip-flop get mocked; family and friends who cross tribal borders are shunned. But shouldn’t we be encouraging people to change their minds? And how can we get better at it ourselves?

  • 398. The Truth About the Vaping Crisis

    398. The Truth About the Vaping Crisis

    21/11/2019 Duración: 44min

    A recent outbreak of illness and death has gotten everyone’s attention — including late-to-the-game regulators. But would a ban on e-cigarettes do more harm than good? We smoke out the facts.

  • 397. How to Save $32 Million in One Hour

    397. How to Save $32 Million in One Hour

    14/11/2019 Duración: 45min

    For nearly a decade, governments have been using behavioral nudges to solve problems — and the strategy is catching on in healthcare, firefighting, and policing. But is that thinking too small? Could nudging be used to fight income inequality and achieve world peace? Recorded live in London, with commentary from Andy Zaltzman (The Bugle).

  • 396. Why Does Tipping Still Exist?

    396. Why Does Tipping Still Exist?

    07/11/2019 Duración: 47min

    It’s an acutely haphazard way of paying workers, and yet it keeps expanding. We dig into the data to find out why.

  • 395. Speak Softly and Carry Big Data

    395. Speak Softly and Carry Big Data

    31/10/2019 Duración: 01h03min

    Do economic sanctions work? Are big democracies any good at spreading democracy? What is the root cause of terrorism? It turns out that data analysis can help answer all these questions — and make better foreign-policy decisions. Guests include former Department of Defense officials Chuck Hagel and Michèle Flournoy and Chicago Project on Security and Threats researchers Robert Pape and Paul Poast. Recorded live in Chicago; Steve Levitt is co-host.

  • 394. Does Hollywood Still Have a Princess Problem?

    394. Does Hollywood Still Have a Princess Problem?

    24/10/2019 Duración: 50min

    For decades, there’s been a huge gender disparity both on-screen and behind the scenes. But it seems like cold, hard data — with an assist from the actor Geena Davis — may finally be moving the needle.

  • 393. Can Britain Get Its “Great” Back?

    393. Can Britain Get Its “Great” Back?

    17/10/2019 Duración: 01h06s

    It used to be a global capital of innovation, invention, and exploration. Now it’s best known for its messy European divorce. We visit London to see if the British spirit of discovery is still alive. Guests include the mayor of London, undersea explorers, a time-use researcher, and a theoretical physicist who helped Liverpool win the Champions League. Dan Schreiber from No Such Thing as a Fish rides shotgun.

  • 392. The Prime Minister Who Cried Brexit

    392. The Prime Minister Who Cried Brexit

    10/10/2019 Duración: 52min

    In 2016, David Cameron held a referendum on whether the U.K. should stay in the European Union. A longtime Euroskeptic, he nevertheless led the Remain campaign. So what did Cameron really want? We ask him that and much more — including why he left office as soon as his side lost and what he’d do differently if given another chance. (Hint: not much.)

  • 391. America’s Math Curriculum Doesn’t Add Up

    391. America’s Math Curriculum Doesn’t Add Up

    03/10/2019 Duración: 45min

    Most high-school math classes are still preparing students for the Sputnik era. Steve Levitt wants to get rid of the “geometry sandwich” and instead have kids learn what they really need in the modern era: data fluency.