The Economist Radio (All audio)

Informações:

Sinopsis

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

Episodios

  • Who’s to say? Facebook, Trump and free speech

    Who’s to say? Facebook, Trump and free speech

    06/05/2021 Duración: 21min

    The social-media giant’s external-review body upheld a ban on former president Donald Trump—for now. We ask how a narrow ruling reflects on far broader questions of free speech and regulation. America’s young offenders are often handed long sentences and face disproportionate harms; we examine reforms that are slowly taking hold. And the Broadway mental-health musical that is a surprise hit in China.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money Talks: Berkshire after Buffett

    Money Talks: Berkshire after Buffett

    05/05/2021 Duración: 25min

    Now that the world’s most celebrated investor has named a successor, the conglomerate he created must face some hard truths. Also, as companies wrestle with thorny issues from climate change to voting rights, economist Dambisa Moyo argues corporate boards need a makeover. And, the pandemic has coaxed millions of older people online—now companies are racing to keep up with the silver surfers. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Cache and carry: American states’ gun-law push

    Cache and carry: American states’ gun-law push

    05/05/2021 Duración: 21min

    Today another state will enact a “permitless carry” law—no licence, checks or training required. We ask why states’ loosening of safeguards fails to reflect public sentiment. Brexit has supercharged Scottish nationalism, and this week’s elections may pave the way to another independence referendum. And a long-forgotten coffee species may weather the climate-change era.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Belt, road and orbit

    Babbage: Belt, road and orbit

    04/05/2021 Duración: 22min

    China recently launched the first module of its new space station—what impact will this have on the international scientific community? Also, how orbiting telescopes could be useful in diagnosing cancer. And when solving problems, why do people prefer to innovate by adding things rather than getting rid of them? Kenneth Cukier hosts For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our new weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Strait shooting? The growing peril to Taiwan

    Strait shooting? The growing peril to Taiwan

    04/05/2021 Duración: 21min

    A decades-old policy of “strategic ambiguity” is breaking down; we ask about the risks and the stakes of a potential Chinese bid to take Taiwan by force. The number of diseases jumping from animals to humans is set to keep rising; we look at why, and how to make the jump rarer. And the misguided mission to understand canine communication. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Jab: Might vaccine diplomacy misfire?

    The Jab: Might vaccine diplomacy misfire?

    03/05/2021 Duración: 36min

    Vaccines have become a tool of global influence. China and Russia have sent millions of doses abroad, but the West has lagged in vaccine diplomacy. What are the risks and rewards?Agathe Demarais of The Economist Intelligence Unit, who wrote a report on the subject, tells The Jab how China and Russia’s vaccine diplomacy could backfire.Alok Jha and Natasha Loder are joined by Edward Carr, The Economist’s deputy editor, and Argentina correspondent David Smith.For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/thejabpod. Sign up for our new weekly science and data newsletters at economist.com/simplyscience and economist.com/offthecharts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The turn at a century: Northern Ireland’s anniversary

    The turn at a century: Northern Ireland’s anniversary

    03/05/2021 Duración: 22min

    The province’s largest party aligned with Britain has lost its leader; in the 100 years since the island was split it has rarely seemed so close to reuniting. Diplomacy, as with so much else, had to go online during the pandemic—and emerged more efficient and inclusive than many expected. And how art-lovers are getting ever more fully immersed. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s Picks: May 3rd 2021

    Editor’s Picks: May 3rd 2021

    02/05/2021 Duración: 35min

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Taiwan: the most dangerous place on earth, post-covid syndrome (09:00) and Buttonwood: private-credit markets (28:55)  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Checks and Balance: 100 days of aptitude

    Checks and Balance: 100 days of aptitude

    30/04/2021 Duración: 41min

    A portrait of Franklin Roosevelt hangs in the Oval Office, where Joe Biden convenes historians to share how his hero began changing the country in his very first weeks as president. But the new president faces tough trade-offs to secure his ambitious agenda. How much might this presidency transform America?Historian Niall Ferguson tells us presidents learn the wrong lessons from those who came before them. The Economist’s Washington correspondent Idrees Kahloon and data journalist Elliott Morris also join.John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Jon Fasman.For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/USpod  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Illiberal-arts degrees: Hungary’s universities seized

    Illiberal-arts degrees: Hungary’s universities seized

    30/04/2021 Duración: 22min

    Prime Minister Viktor Orban’s proudly “illiberal democracy” has nobbled nearly every institution. Now that his ruling party will run the higher-education system, expect a propaganda blitz. We examine research that points toward a long-sought blood test for clinical depression—one that would identify targeted treatments. And remembering Native American historian and campaigner LaDonna Brave Bull Allard. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist Asks: Tammy Duckworth

    The Economist Asks: Tammy Duckworth

    29/04/2021 Duración: 27min

    In 2004 Tammy Duckworth was shot down by Iraqi insurgents while she was serving in the army and lost both legs in the attack. As America withdraws troops from Afghanistan, Anne McElvoy asks the Illinois senator about the legacy of America's interventions abroad and whether President Biden is making the right decision. The first Thai-American woman in Congress says there is "enough pie for everyone" and minority groups in Congress should work together. Also, what scares her?  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A word in edgewise: Turkey, Armenia and genocide

    A word in edgewise: Turkey, Armenia and genocide

    29/04/2021 Duración: 22min

    In calling the 1915 campaign against Armenians a genocide, President Joe Biden has rekindled tensions that never really faded—and has perhaps delayed a rapprochement. Chinese authorities fear religion, particularly when it is practised out of sight; we look at increasing repression of China’s tens of millions of Christians. And tracking the coronavirus’s spread by dipping into Britain’s sewers.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Post-covid syndrome

    Babbage: Post-covid syndrome

    28/04/2021 Duración: 27min

    As research on long covid advances, how should countries respond to the impending public health emergency? Also, new hope in the fight against malaria in the form of a highly effective vaccine. And, why the sound of nature might be good for your health. Kenneth Cukier hosts A note for our listeners: from May 4th 2021 Babbage will be published every Tuesday.For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our new weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A great deal to be desired: Europe-Britain trade

    A great deal to be desired: Europe-Britain trade

    28/04/2021 Duración: 21min

    Europe’s parliament has overwhelmingly voted to extend a stopgap trade agreement. But the rancour behind the vote, and the deal’s thin measures, say much about future relations. Female soldiers are entering armed forces in big numbers, but they still face barriers both in getting the job and in doing it. And China’s homegrown Oscar-winning director is scrubbed from its internet. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money Talks: The QE quandary

    Money Talks: The QE quandary

    27/04/2021 Duración: 23min

    As economies recover, central bankers will need to decide what to do with their asset-purchase schemes and their enormous balance-sheets. We look at how quantitative easing was pioneered in Japan 20 years ago and why it is still a black box. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • SPAClash: the buzz and the bust

    SPAClash: the buzz and the bust

    27/04/2021 Duración: 20min

    Special-purpose acquisition companies offer a novel way for companies to list on stockmarkets. We look behind the buzz, and something of a recent bust, to discover why they are a useful innovation both for investors and markets. President Jair Bolsonaro wants every Brazilian citizen to have a gun—especially his supporters. And a visit to the world’s largest magazine archive.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Jab: What lessons have been learned?

    The Jab: What lessons have been learned?

    26/04/2021 Duración: 38min

    More than a billion vaccines have been administered. But the contrast between Israel, largely free of covid-19, and India, struggling with a catastrophic second wave, is stark. What explains the discrepancy?    Devi Sridhar, Founding Director of the Global Health Governance Programme, tells us what to expect as the next billion vaccines roll out. Alok Jha and Natasha Loder are joined by Slavea Chankova, The Economist’s health-care correspondent, and technology correspondent Hal Hodson. Anshel Pfeffer reports from Israel.For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/thejabpod. Sign up for our new weekly science and data newsletters at economist.com/simplyscience and economist.com/offthecharts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The World Ahead: Government via Siri

    The World Ahead: Government via Siri

    26/04/2021 Duración: 22min

    Governments’ efforts to move their services and operations online have been accelerated by the pandemic. Host Tom Standage finds out which countries are leading the way, and which are lagging behind. What are the barriers that must be overcome, and where is e-government heading next? Subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  Music by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC by 4.0)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Extremist prejudice: rebranding Navalny

    Extremist prejudice: rebranding Navalny

    26/04/2021 Duración: 23min

    Russian courts’ bid to designate opposition leader Alexei Navalny’s movement as a terrorist organisation is unsurprising: it fits a narrative of increasing repression at home and sabre-rattling at the borders. Africa’s vaccination drive is beset by shortcomings in both supply and demand; we examine the rising number of bottlenecks. And a forgotten African-American composer at last gets her due.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s Picks: April 26th 2021

    Editor’s Picks: April 26th 2021

    25/04/2021 Duración: 31min

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Putin’s next move, the pandemic in India (10:20) and the rise of the robot critic (18:35).  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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