The Economist Radio (All audio)

Informações:

Sinopsis

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

Episodios

  • Checks and Balance: Voting wars

    13/05/2022 Duración: 45min

    Primary season is in full swing but more than a third of voters and a majority of Republicans still believe the last election was stolen. At the centre of this struggle is Georgia, which in 2020 had the tightest presidential election results in the country. It has since passed restrictive new voting laws, locking both Republicans and Democrats into a fierce fight over electoral fairness. We explore why the parties have so much power over the running of elections in America and ask what it will take to restore voters’ faith in their own democracy. John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Idrees Kahloon. Idrees has been reporting from Georgia where he spoke to Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger about what’s at stake for Georgia voters this time around. We look back at why the mechanics of how Americans vote have changed so much and so frequently over time. And we hear from Nse Ufot, head of the New Georgia Project, a voter-registration organisation, about the impact of new voting laws on the coming

  • Arm Scandi: Britain’s mutual-defence pact

    13/05/2022 Duración: 27min

    Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s collective-defence deal with Swedish and Finnish leaders represents a shift in the European order—and Britain’s post-Brexit place in it. Our correspondent visits Great Zimbabwe, a long-overlooked archaeological site of stunning proportions whose secrets are only now being revealed. And a look at the weird sensory thrill of ASMR through a new exhibition. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist Asks: What if America reverts to abortion bans?

    12/05/2022 Duración: 28min

    For 50 years, women in America have had a constitutional right to terminate a pregnancy. Now, a leaked draft opinion suggests that the Supreme Court will overturn Roe v Wade. Anne McElvoy asks Mary Ziegler, a legal historian, about the origins of the landmark legislation and what would happen if Roe is cast aside. Plus, does the Supreme Court need reforming?Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Entrenched: stalemate in Ukraine’s east

    12/05/2022 Duración: 25min

    Russia’s bid to conquer the eastern region of Donbas is proceeding at a snail’s pace. All over Ukraine resistance continues and a grinding, prolonged conflict looms. Police reform remains controversial in America even two years after George Floyd’s murder. We visit two alternative-policing efforts to see how things might change. And examining the cultural chronicle tucked within Britain’s rules-of-the-road handbook. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money Talks: Out of gas

    11/05/2022 Duración: 33min

    Russia’s trade surplus has continued to grow, even in the wake of Western sanctions. It’s now forecast to be double what it was last year. That’s prompted an acknowledgement among Western countries that more needs to be done to squeeze the country economically. Recently, the G7 announced plans to completely wean itself off of Russian oil; the European Union is trying to follow suit. But that still leaves a gigantic loophole: natural gas.In this week’s episode, host Mike Bird goes back to a key point in the 1970s to find out how Germany, Europe’s largest economy, became so reliant on Russian gas. Our European economics editor Christian Odendahl and our Berlin bureau chief Vendeline Von Bredow examine the geopolitical fallout from Germany’s misguided energy policy. And Georg Zachmann of the Bruegel Institute explains why liquified natural gas could potentially be part of the short-term solution.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.

  • It’s a family affair: Sri Lanka’s protests turn deadly

    11/05/2022 Duración: 23min

    Demonstrations that eventually ousted the prime minister have cost lives, but the protest mood is not fading: many want every member of the storied Rajapaksa family out of government. We examine an effort to develop undersea GPS and learn why a watery sat-nav would be so useful. And why 1972 was such a formative year for music in Brazil.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: An app a day keeps the doctor away

    10/05/2022 Duración: 44min

    Wearable devices, such as fitness trackers and smartwatches, can measure a growing array of health indicators. Machine learning can filter that torrent of data to reveal a continuous, quantified picture of you and your health. But wearables linked to health apps are not only able to help diagnose diseases—they are beginning to treat them too. We explore the technology that promises to revolutionise health care. Alok Jha hosts.Listen to our recent episodes on the use of wearable technologies in health care at economist.com/babbagewearables.For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Out like a Lam: Hong Kong’s new leader

    10/05/2022 Duración: 21min

    John Lee, the successor to Chief Executive Carrie Lam, won by a predictable landslide: he is just the sort of law-and-order type party leaders in Beijing wanted. As the rich world emerges from the pandemic, surges in activity abound—particularly the opening of new businesses. And ahead of the Eurovision Song Contest semi-finals, we hear about this year’s entrants from Ukraine.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s Picks: May 9th 2022

    09/05/2022 Duración: 24min

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how to save the supreme court from itself, how wearable technology promises to revolutionise health care (10:29) and our Bartleby columnist on why working from anywhere isn't realistic (18:29)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Under-armed sweat: America’s “arsenal of democracy”

    09/05/2022 Duración: 22min

    America accounts for the lion’s share of weaponry sent to Ukraine. But that may leave it short of arms in onward conflicts; boosting production is not as easy as it may seem. The widespread cost-of-living crunch is particularly acute in Britain; we visit a food bank to see how people are coping. And the surprising demographic trends shaping contemporary California.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Checks and Balance: After Roe

    06/05/2022 Duración: 47min

    A leaked draft opinion suggests that the Supreme Court is preparing to overturn Roe v Wade. But the verdict will not end fights over abortion in America. Both pro-choice and anti-abortion movements are furiously preparing for what comes next. What will the post-Roe era look like? And if the justices do overturn a 50-year-old precedent and hand decisions on abortion back to the states, what might the Supreme Court do next?The Economist’s Steven Mazie explains what the leak reveals about the inner workings of America’s highest court. Our correspondent Stevie Hertz visits Illinois and Missouri to find out what the end of Roe will mean in practice. She speaks to Dr Colleen McNicholas, regional chief medical officer of Planned Parenthood, Michele Landeau, head of the Missouri Abortion Fund, and anti-abortion lawyer and state representative Mary Elizabeth Coleman. And David French, a conservative Christian writer and author of “Divided We Fall”, considers whether the reasoning that could overturn Roe might be appli

  • The son shines: elections in the Philippines

    06/05/2022 Duración: 26min

    Voters in the Philippines choose a new president on Monday. The likely winner is a scion of one of the country’s most controversial families. Exxon struck oil off the coast of Guyana a few years back. How will becoming a petrostate change this small country on South America’s northern coast? And koalas are adorable but imperilled—by development, stray dogs and now, a quickly spreading bacterial infection.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist Asks: Could the Ukraine war turn nuclear?

    05/05/2022 Duración: 26min

    In ten weeks of conflict Vladimir Putin has not been afraid to rattle the nuclear sabre. Western leaders have responded by tempering their own rhetoric – but the risk of nuclear war is greater than it has been for more than half a century. Anne McElvoy asks Rose Gottemoeller, a former deputy secretary-general at NATO, whether Russia will launch nuclear weapons and, if it did, what the West should do. And, has NATO proved its worth?Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Powell’s points presentation: the Fed raises rates

    05/05/2022 Duración: 21min

    Prices in America are rising faster than at any time in the past 40 years. In response, the Federal Reserve has made its steepest interest-rate hike in 20 years. Will it be enough to tame inflation while not tipping America into recession? Shanghai’s residents are growing restive after a long lockdown. And Nelson Mandela’s name and legacy are being used to sell a growing range of consumer goods.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money Talks: Proxy wars

    04/05/2022 Duración: 33min

    A record number of company shareholders have put forward resolutions at annual meetings this year, pressuring companies on everything from their environmental practices to political donations. Host Alice Fulwood asks our US business editor Charlotte Howard why the new frontline in corporate purpose has shifted to proxy battles. Plus, our US audio correspondent Stevie Hertz heads to Nebraska to find out more about a contentious resolution to unseat Warren Buffett from Berkshire Hathaway. And Thomas DiNapoli, the head of one of America’s largest pension funds, explains why the fund is supporting resolutions on everything from worker’s rights at Starbucks to racial equity at Amazon this year and weighs in on the spat between Disney and Florida Governor Ron DeSantis.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer &#

  • Stormont weather: elections in Northern Ireland

    04/05/2022 Duración: 24min

    Voters in the UK head to the polls for local elections tomorrow. In Northern Ireland, a party that does not want the country to exist appears poised to win the largest number of seats. Why a Nebraskan company’s annual general meeting has become known as “the Woodstock of capitalism.” And how the art of cattle trading is getting a 21st century makeover.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Bill Gates's plan to prevent the next pandemic

    03/05/2022 Duración: 33min

    New diseases are inevitable, but pandemics are not. As the threat from covid-19 recedes, how can the world stop new pathogens from becoming health emergencies? Business leader and philanthropist Bill Gates has long warned of the risk that a novel virus would go global. He tells Geoff Carr, The Economist’s science and technology editor, about his plan to pandemic-proof the planet. Alok Jha hosts.For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Roe-ing away: Abortion rights in America

    03/05/2022 Duración: 27min

    A leaked draft opinion shows America’s Supreme Court is ready to let states outlaw abortion. We explore the implications for American politics, and the rights of millions of American women. Around 85% of the world’s population lives in countries, often democracies at peace, where press freedom has declined over the past five years. And remembering the typist of Oskar Schindler’s list.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s Picks: May 2nd 2022

    02/05/2022 Duración: 21min

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how rotten is Russia’s army? France’s re-elected president prepares for a tough second term (10:30) and a struggle over artistic freedom suggests a better way out of the culture wars (15:25).   Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • ROC and a hard place: Taiwan’s lessons from Ukraine

    02/05/2022 Duración: 22min

    Much like Ukraine, Taiwan has a well-armed neighbour that does not think it exists as a state: China. We ask what both sides are learning from Russia’s invasion. A heavy-handed string of arrests following a flare-up of gang violence in El Salvador is unlikely to change matters. And an analysis reveals the connection between weather and whether voters support climate-change legislation. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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